Which Super Bowl 50 Ads Worked on Social Media (And Which Ones Didn’t)

The work week after the Super Bowl has long been reserved for discussing the best and worst commercials of the night. But that’s only part of it. You don’t need a commercial to win the internet and advertisers continue to get creative. Rather than judging the best ad, let’s look at who created the most impact online.

Last year we were left discussing a dead Nationwide kid and a shark that couldn’t dance but stole America’s heart. So, what was memorable about 2016?

The most successful advertisement online wasn’t even a Super Bowl commercial. As usual, Budweiser had some of the most memorable commercials of the night, this year’s hottest new pet is a Puppymonkeybaby and the unofficial mascot of the night was a lovable lower intestine. Rumors are the Xifaxan mascot already has a show in development.

Social media is the water cooler now, in real-time. We crave the weird, the absurd, and the unexpected. Advertisers take notice. It’s not what you do in 30 seconds that matters, it’s the conversation and commerce you create beyond those 30 seconds.

What worked

Esurance was the most mentioned brand during the Super Bowl, by far. #Esurancesweepstakes, which asked people to tweet for a chance to win $1 million, was well over 2 million Tweets by Monday, according to data published in AdWeek. Pepsi, with the boost of a sponsored hashtag, generated only half a million tweets.

A 30 second Super Bowl commercial cost $5 million this year. Esurance, which launched their contest before the Super Bowl, lapped the field in exposure and spent only $1 million (plus the cost of a lower-priced, pre-game ad).

Budweiser’s Helen Mirren ad received the most views online. A shockingly simple message about a delicate topic was designed to spark discussion—and it did. InBev also got Peyton Manning to mention he was going to drink Budweiser after the game.

Constipation won big. If you look at USA Today’s Ad Meter, drug commercials finished dead last. But Xifaxan, which was 62 out of 63, scored an unexpected online hit with a lower intestine running for the bathroom and high-fiving fans. People couldn’t stop talking about him. I have no idea what the side effects are. Well played, Xifaxan.

Puppymonkeybaby may haunt your dreams for days but it is memorable. It has generated 11 million views online and was the most trending commercial of the first half of the game. It was a wise choice by Mountain Dew to air the commercial early and own the initial social media conversation.

What didn’t work

Drake and Steve Harvey are great. T-Mobile’s use of them wasn’t bad. But Internet culture is always about the next meme, not the last one. You knew where the commercial was going. This is something that may have worked 10 years ago, but viewers—particularly those on social media—expect things in real-time, not months later.

Budweiser’s Not Backing Down commercial was thirsty in all the wrong ways. They were desperately trying to keep customers, make fun of craft-beer drinkers and use their history as an appeal. It didn’t work with viewers or online. Bring back horses and puppies next year.

Eli Manning had a rough night. His stone-cold reaction to brother Peyton’s success was the best thing on the Internet. You can’t hide from the Internet. If you make a weird face, they will find it.

Speaking of weird faces, RIP Skittles Steven Tyler (2016-2016).

What might have worked

Taco Bell, which created Pre-Super Bowl intrigue around a top secret new innovation, launched the Quesalupa during the Super Bowl. The ad didn’t play well with USA Today’s Ad Meter but has created good online buzz. Taco Bell’s focus is more on digital where they are making an attempt to own Monday with a series of digital spots featuring local ad legends like the Texas Law Hawk.

Whether it’s a popular hashtag or a buzz-worthy mascot, one thing is for sure: online impact is the new measure of Super Bowl ad success.

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AdWords Smart Goals: not a smart move for advertisers

If I told you that your company could automate your paid search advertising bids based on the conversion data of thousands of other businesses, but not your own data, would you tell me to take a hike?

I think it’s safe to say that many of us PPC professionals disagree with Smart Goals for various reasons – and think this new offering from AdWords is just downright dumb.

There’s certainly been some heated conversations around the web on the issue of Smart Goals, and this post from Julie Bacchini of Neptune Moon has some very good points.

Let’s look a little closer at what I believe the issues to be, and I’ll end on a positive note by highlighting something interesting that Smart Goals is doing.

smart goals

Companies that might use Smart Goals are not all that unsophisticated

First, it really doesn’t matter if the company that would use Smart Goals is a local brick-and-mortar storefront or an enterprise business. In my opinion, the data is not providing anything valuable to anyone.

However, AdWords talks it up as something that the small to medium-sized business can use, because, hey – if they’re not using any tracking conversion at all, they might as well use some kind of data.

From the announcement (as linked to previously):

To generate Smart Goals, we apply machine learning across thousands of websites that use Google Analytics and have opted in to share anonymized conversion data. From this information, we can distill dozens of key factors that correlate with likelihood to convert: things like session duration, pages per session, location, device and browser. We can then apply these key factors to any website. The easiest way to think about Smart Goals is that they reflect your website visits that our model indicates are most likely to lead to conversions.

That’s like saying to a lost traveler, “Since you don’t have a GPS, I’m going to draw this map on a napkin, and I’m really not familiar with the area, but [shrug] it’s better than not having any directions at all!”

While the positioning statement via Google (and some of the surrounding opinions I’ve heard) is geared towards advertisers who may not be as sophisticated as others, hence, they don’t have conversion tracking – I bet if we looked a little closer, we’d see just who those advertisers might be.

For example, would you call a global multimillion-dollar brand that spends $30,ooo a month on AdWords an unsophisticated advertiser?

No?

Because those types of companies often don’t have conversion tracking for one reason or another – usually because there are so many layers to getting updates on the site (let alone installing a tracking code) that it creates a roadblock to getting anything done.

Plus, there’s also this interesting requirement to get Smart Goals going (from the Google announcement):

Note that your Google Analytics view must receive at least 1,000 clicks from AdWords over a 30-day period to ensure the validity of your data.

That’s not really small potatoes. So you have to get 1,000 clicks from AdWords to validate unreliable data? Hmmm …

To play devil’s advocate, let’s just pretend you run a small business and you advertise in search and you now have access to this Smart Goals feature.

And let’s say you’re the type of person who is focused on running a business – not your advertising – and aren’t tracking conversions, probably don’t have Google Analytics installed on your site, and if you do, never look at the thing.

So here comes this feature that again asks you to take some form of action with your tracking, and gives you data but doesn’t give you the tools to optimize your AdWords account in a smart way so you’re set up for real ROI.

Does this sound reasonable?

Smart goals + target CPA = more $ for Google

Okay, I said it. As PPC pros, we don’t want to bite the hand that feeds us, but we look out for our clients first and foremost, and something stinks about this Smart Goals/target CPA pairing.

From the announcement, Google says:

One of the benefits of measuring conversions in your Adwords account is the ability to set a target cost per acquisition (CPA) as opposed to just setting a cost per click (CPC). If you aren’t measuring actual conversions today, importing Smart Goals as conversions in Adwords allows you to set a target CPA. In this way, you’re able to optimize your Adwords spend based on the likelihood of conversion as determined by our model.

Translation: let’s get these advertisers on autopilot.

I’ll venture to guess that Smart Goals + target CPA may be the new up-and-coming default setting AdWords will include on all those business accounts that are never touched beyond the initial set up. What do you think?

I shudder at the thought, but I wouldn’t be surprised if businesses start getting cold calls from agencies that promise to ‘optimize’ their AdWords accounts on a monthly basis using Smart Goals for as little as $200 a month.

On a positive note …

I said I would end on a positive note, and I do think it’s interesting how Google created a workaround for conversion tracking using engagement factors. And I see how that can work.

Remember that example I gave of a multimillion-dollar brand not tracking conversions? I know this because of experience my agency has with this type of scenario.

And often in this situation, we’ll optimize ad campaigns for engagement factors like time on site and pages per session.

Right about now, you’re probably wondering why, if I do this type of conversion optimization around engagement factors, do I have such a problem with Smart Goals.

Here’s one difference: My agency is a partner with our clients and actively manages the bids and their ad accounts based on metrics we’re closely watching, taking into account their business and advertising goals, budgets and preferences.

One client that didn’t have conversion tracking and that we were optimizing their campaigns for engagement metrics did see a 20% lift in their revenue coming from the PPC channel, so we know it works.

But, engagement metrics differ from business to business. As Julie pointed out in her article (linked to at the top of the page):

A very simple example here, if a site has calls as their conversion goal, their pages per session and session duration are often quite short. If you have a good landing page, calls happen fast and goals are achieved. Conversely, if you have a lead generation type of site, people often need to spend longer on your site and consume more page content before filling out your lead form.

As you can see, I’m simply not a fan of Smart Goals, and am less of a fan of what this might imply for countless businesses and their advertising.

But maybe I’m wrong… maybe it will help some companies – and I’d love to hear your take on it in the comments below.

Are the Days of the Public Social Media Rant Over?

This post was originally published on The Financial Post.

Have you ever tweeted a customer service complaint or posted a query on a company’s Facebook page and heard nothing back? It turns out you’re not alone. A recent survey of 500 top retailers shows only 20 percent of questions sent via Twitter and 54 percent via Facebook get a response. And the average response time is more than 27 hours.

Twitter and Facebook overhaul customer service functions

Fortunately, updates at Twitter and Facebook promise to overhaul the way customer service is done on social media. Gone are the days of consumers ranting to friends and followers about delayed flights and faulty merchandise to little avail. Instead, some social networks are offering ways for companies to connect one-on-one with their customers. Innovative chat and messaging functions are promising to take customer service back behind closed doors.

That’s if companies are ready and consumers are willing to give up the power of the public rant.

The social customer service gap

An estimated 67 percent of consumers now tap networks such as Twitter and Facebook for customer service. For the socially savvy, the appeal is obvious: Rather than suffer through interminable help lines or wait patiently for a response via email, users can Tweet and, in theory, get speedy, personalized attention.

However, the effectiveness of taking a company to task in public appears to be waning. Many companies have been numbed into indifference by the sheer volume of messages: It’s not uncommon for major airlines, for example, to receive upward of 10,000 Tweets a day. Unless users have large social followings, or their messages manage to go viral, their complaints may not see prompt redress.

As well, an angry post can do more to harden a company’s indifference than resolve the problem. “Threatening, insulting, demeaning are things that will never work,” notes social media consultant Aalap Shah in a CBS interview. Not to mention, not every customer complaint or issue lends itself to being resolved via social media. “As communications are public by default, asking customers to hand over account numbers and bank details is an obvious no-no,” said James O’Malley for TechDigest.

Small changes, big consequences

The updates at Twitter and Facebook promise consumers—and companies—a discreet and efficient way to resolve customer complaints on social media. Twitter has long had a private channel, known as Direct Messages, or DM, but using it hasn’t been easy. The parties have needed to follow one another before taking the conversation private. This awkward extra step has meant most customer service has been conducted out in the open.

Earlier this year, Twitter ditched the “mutual follow” requirement, meaning companies and customers can now contact each other directly and privately. At the same time, Twitter lifted its standard 140-character limit for Direct Messages, turning DM into something similar to an instant messaging or chat service. Customers and companies can now tackle all sorts of complex issues in longer messages, without a flurry of Tweets going back and forth and away from prying eyes.

Meanwhile, Facebook opened up its popular Messenger app to businesses. Instead of venting on a brand’s Facebook page, customers can interact directly with customer service agents at participating companies via the instant messaging app. Messenger Business is still in its early phases, with just a handful of companies participating, including online retailers Zulily and Everland. But Facebook is marketing the tool as a broader solution for companies seeking to “have personal, real-time conversations” with customers.

Is better customer service really on the horizon?

If private social channels end up being another graveyard for customer complaints, with issues shunted into long queues or ignored altogether, they’re unlikely to catch on. On the other hand, if consumers can find quick satisfaction, the days of customer service as a spectator sport may well be numbered.

If private social channels end up being another graveyard for customer complaints… they’re unlikely to catch on.

— Ryan Holmes

The updates to Twitter and Facebook provide new opportunities for companies to reach customers on social media, but they also bring new challenges. If used effectively, new social messaging tools will result in less of a company’s dirty laundry being aired to the world. This is obviously a big plus: No business owner likes to see her product’s or service’s foibles or occasional screw-ups maligned in public or, worse still, go viral. (Airlines, financial institutions and Internet, phone and cable providers traditionally bear the brunt of this vitriol.)

But making full use of these channels will require businesses to significantly up their social media game. “[It] makes it even easier for consumers to reach out to brands via social,” digital media executive Kevin Purcer said in Adweek. “Customer support teams will need to adjust…” Training, not to mention specialized software to triage social messages and route issues to proper staff, will be required to keep up with the heavier volume. (I can attest to this. I get more executives reaching out to me at Hootsuite looking for tools to handle social media customer service than for any other request.)

The promise of social media customer service can seem elusive, but when it’s done right the results can be impressive. We have more than 10 million users worldwide; they can tweet us and typically get a response in less than 30 minutes. When they take to social media, it’s generally not to rant about our service… but to tell their friends they have to sign up.

Who really won the Super Bowl? A consumer search investigation

Every year, roughly 110 million households (46% of Americans) tune into the most iconic football game of the year.

When consumers have questions or are seeking information related to the Super Bowl they turn to Google as it’s one of the most searched for events of the year in the world.

Let’s analyze some of the consumer search data to see this year’s real winners.

In addition to battling on the football field, the Broncos and Panthers battled for search volume too. It was neck and neck throughout until Denver pulled away when the game looked to be out of reach.

sb 01

Brands pay big bucks for Super Bowl television spots, so measuring their effectiveness is essential and can be tricky. One way to do so is to look at which ads drove the most search volume (consumer engagement).

Advertiser search interest during Super Bowl

Looking at the top commercials, it looks like the Audi r8 Commander spot drove the most searches. This was followed by Jeep’s Portraits spot. Hyundai’s Ryanville ad was entertaining (who doesn’t love Ryan Reynolds?) but didn’t drive the volume of the other car competitor’s ads. Doritos had two funny ads and you can see in the chart that search volume spiked when they ran, but was considerably less than Audi and Jeep. Heinz came through with the cutest ad by far but barely registered a blip compared to the others.

sb 02

sb 03

Comparing the quarterbacks throughout the season it’s interesting how close it is. As the season goes on and other teams are eliminated, search volume spikes tremendously as the nation’s eyes are focused solely on them.

sb 04

Looking at what Super Bowl-related activities had the highest search volume clearly shows halftime has the most interest with ads, teams and recipes not even coming close.

sb 05

Who won the halftime show?

Speaking of the halftime show, Chris Martin and Bruno Mars did a great job but nobody upstages Beyoncé and that was evident in the search data. Lady Gaga also had a major spike after her tremendous rendition of the National Anthem.

sb 06

sb

Left Shark meme search interest during 2016 Super Bowl

Everybody’s favorite part of last year’s half time show also peaked during the halftime of this year’s Super Bowl. The viral sensation that captured America’s hearts last year was also referenced all over social media…

sb 07

sb 08

left shark tweets

Professional sports search interest year-over-year (US)

America loves football much more so than any other major sport. That is apparent when comparing search volumes of the other United States pro sports championship games. The Super Bowl dwarfs the others – it’s no wonder advertisers pay a premium for television spots. Interestingly though, the US is even more interested in the FIFA World Cup (the years it takes place anyway).

professional sports us searches

sb 11

Super Bowl search winners:

  • Lady Gaga
  • Beyoncé
  • Denver Broncos
  • Peyton Manning
  • Audi
  • Jeep
  • Left Shark (Back-to-Back years!)

Super Bowl search losers:

Ben Rotundo is an SEO Manager at DigitasLBi

Will It Fly? Becomes a Bestseller! Shout-Outs to All Who Helped

My new book, Will It Fly?, is now a bestseller!

It hit #1 in all business related categories on Amazon this week, including #1 in Entrepreneurship, #1 in Startups, and even #1 in Self-Help/Motivational. Furthermore, the paperback copy of the book got up to #80 Overall Best Seller (out of all books!), and the Kindle version climbed to Top #22 Overall Best Seller in the Kindle Store.

And at one point, both the Kindle and Paperback copy were both #1 and #2 in the Entrepreneurial category, which was super cool to see:

Screenshot 2016-02-03 15.01.31

It’s still pretty crazy to me to see it do so well in the rankings, surpassing several authors I admire and well-known books that have been around for ages. Of course, I’m coming off the excitement of the launch and the true test is how well will the book do over the long haul, but based on many of the comments from readers, it’s set up to be a big game-changer and one that should have some good legs to it.

Almost a dozen people have called it “the next 4-Hour Work Week,” which is an incredibly amazing comment to hear, especially because that book helped change my life. I’m hoping my book will do the same for others for a long time to come.

Thank —all of you—who have helped support the book in one way or another. Whether you purchased a copy, many copies, or simply shared it with others, I’m incredibly thankful for you and your support.

And if you have yet to pick up the book, click here to get it now!

Where Will It Fly? Was Featured

I wanted to take this opportunity to give a shout out to those who helped promote the book. Some of the links below are to interviews on podcasts and blogs that were planned months in advance, and others reviews and mentions were done without me even knowing it, which is awesome!

If you happen to write a review about Will It Fly? on your blog, or feature it in a podcast of your own, shoot me an email at [email protected], and I’ll include that link and highlight it here too.

Will It Fly Book: Business Validation Strategies from Pat Flynn [LNIM090] (Late Night Internet Marketing)

YOU150 – Conquering Self-Publishing & Asking Ourselves ‘Will It Fly?’, with Pat Flynn (YouPreneur with Chris Ducker)

MBA506 Guest Teacher: Pat Flynn – How to Define Your Ideal Customer (The $100 MBA)

Starve Wars – Will It Fly w/ @PatFlynn (Jared Easley on Starve the Doubts)

Test Your Business Idea Without Wasting Time & Money with Pat Flynn (Jaime Tardy and EventualMillionaire.com)

Freedom Hackers Q&A With Pat Flynn [Webinar] (Kimra Luna)

Will It Fly? An Interview with Pat Flynn (Hal Elrod)

How to Test Your Next Business Idea (Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield)

SFN140: Got a Business Idea? Make sure that it will work, with Pat Flynn (Start from Nothing with Andy Drish)

Will It Fly? with Pat Flynn (Build Your Tribe with Chalene Johnson)

Pat Flynn on How to Know If Your Business Idea Will Work (Ray Edwards)

#TLS #118: Proactively Parenting with an Entrepreneurial Mindset with Pat Flynn (The Lively Show with Jess Lively)

101: Will It Fly? How to Validate Your Business Before You Invest, With Pat Flynn (My Wife Quit Her Job with Steve Chou)

Building Business Ideas That Succeed: How to Preflight Your Ideas (The Social Media Examiner Show with Michael Stelzner)

434 – How Do You Know If Your Idea Will Succeed? An Interview with Pat Flynn (Podcast Answer Man with Cliff Ravenscraft)

Are you as good as you’re gonna get? (48 Days with Dan Miller)

SA 86: Pat Flynn Wants You to Fly (The Social Authority Podcast with Amy Schmittauer)

Pat Flynn | Will It Fly? [Episode 483] (The Art of Charm with Jordan Harbinger)

1198: Will It Fly? Pat Flynn Shares How to Test Your Next Business Idea So You Don’t Waste Your Time (Entrepreneur On Fire with John Lee Dumas)

Pat Flynn: How To (Profitably) Launch Anything (Freedom Fast Lane with Ryan Moran)

Pat Flynn Asks, “Will It Fly?” M&M Podcast 15 (Money & Media Podcast with Philip Taylor)

092: Pat Flynn: Validate Your Idea Before You Leap (The Portfolio Life with Jeff Goins)

Pat Flynn: Will It Fly? How to Validate or Find a Profitable Topic For Your Online Business (Entrepreneurs Journey with Yaro Starak)

How to Turn Your Product Daydreams Into Reality (Problogger Podcast with Darren Rowse)

312 | Will Your Business Idea Fly, An Interview with Pat Flynn (Internet Business Mastery)

377: Pat Flynn: Test Your Business Before You Invest (The Solopreneur Hour with Michael O’Neal)

How to Get Your Big Idea Off the Ground (Michael Hyatt Blog)

Change Maker: Pat Flynn of Smart Passive Income (Teachable Blog)

Will It Fly? Pat Flynn Knows the Answer (Write to Be Read with Ani Alexander)

GBL059: My Advice to Those Dreaming About Starting an Online Business (Get Busy Living Blog with Benny Hsu)

Pat Flynn’s New Book Soars (Dot Cannon from Two Maverix)

Will It Fly? Book Launch Team and Book Review (Testing the Muse)

Will It Fly (Make Money with Words with Karmen)

Will It Fly: Book Review (The Seasonal Diet with Sarah)
WNOP 070: Jak przetestowa? swój pomys? na biznes, aby nie zmarnowa? czasu i pieni?dzy – opowiada Pat Flynn (Michal Szafranski)

Will It Fly Book Review (Pat Flynn is So White) (Franki from FBK Write)

How to Test Your Idea Before Taking the Plunge (Sam from My College Life Coach)

How to Validate a Business Idea  (Will from Will You Laugh)

Testing Your Business Idea (Frank from Franc C Jones)

I’d Also Like to Thank…

The launch team, of course, who had an amazing impact on the success of this book. Plus, a whole lot of people who picked up pre-order copies of the book that I promised to say thanks to publicly here on the blog. This includes:

Adam Preiser: WPCrafter.com

Jason Logsdon: ModernistCookingMadeEasy.com

Shimeka Williams: EscapingCubicleCaptivity.com

Monica Louie: OurDebtFreeFamily.com

Walt Breuninger: CanIPlayThrough.com

Tyler Philbrook: IAmtheFutureMe.com

Sam Gavis-Hughson: byte-by-byte.com

Dave Koziel: DaveKoziel.com

Mark Mason: latenightim.com

Scott Maderer: ChristianStewardshipCoaching.com

Brandon Richardson: FBAroadmap.com

Darek Chojnacki: BusinessRunway.com

Susan Rampson: MidlifeFreedom.com

Chris Gilbert: tagrtime.com

Meggan Hill: CulinaryHill.com

Stephanie Dennis: FindingtheBestFit.com

Joe Baird: LearnitMakeit.com

Beth Anne Schwamberger: BrilliantBusinessMoms.com

Jason Resnick: rezzz.com

Vicki Mager: Eyedbands.com

Jeff Lord: WeReadEveryday.com

The 5DayDeal Team: 5daydeal.com

Jeff Agostinelli: JeffAgostinelli.com

LaTesha Burroughs: OptimizePlayer.com

John Meese: JohnMeese.me

Mitzi Eaker: MitziJaneMedia.com

Dylan Tanner: glaance.com

Karen B: FlexFitStudio.com

Ken Blevins: metrowestres.com

Christine Murphy: mythankyousite.com

Anil Agrawal: LeadershipFocusHQ.com

Robin “Kaley” Shorter: spacetosmile.com

Joseph Paun: wrestlingdad.com

Ryan Rhoten: RyanRhoten.com

Ree Klein: PrivateLabelPreneur.com

Grant Brott: HauntedHouseStartup.com

Tripp Fuller: HomebrewedChristianity.com

Sarah Heredia: Eventparty.supplies

Todd Faulk: PsoriasisNow.com

Rick Coplin: RickCoplin.com

Bill Gordon: wgordon3.com

Fumnanya Bernard: TheLimitBreaker.com

Bennett Coughlan: WeLearnWordpress.com

Bryan Kesler: ultimateCPAexamguide.com

Erik VanLandingham: DrivenKid.com

Matthew Smith: SqueakyCleanTeeth.com

Christian Karasiewicz: SocialChefs.com

Carlos Lall: assume-wisely.com

Matt D’Angelo: FlyingJourney.com

John Pullum: Pullum.com

Kenny Azama: BrandAmbassadorWorld.com

Evan Paquette: MagicEvan.com

Molly Mahoney: ThePreparedPerformer.com

Heather Green: lifeinthegreenroom.com

Tanya McGill Freeman: DigitalSophisticate.com

Layne Johnson: LayneJohnson.com

Ethan Robish: EthanRobish.com

Oxana Holtmann: OxanaHoltmann.com

Keith Shimon: body-activation.com

Lily Fouts: LilyAnnFouts.com

Jeremiah Candelaria: WeChooseWonder.com

Chris Goosman: BaselineAudio.com

Joella Castillo: JoellaCastillo.com

Shira Nelson: MomBeyondBaby.com

Jared Caya: OrthoticProstheticStudyGuide.com

Ben Shatto: ThePhysicalTherapyAdvisor.com

Teri Black: tbcrecruiting.com

Kathleen Thompson: KathleenAnnThompson.com

Heather Newton: get.ourstory.online

Dane Gilson: DaneGilson.com

Lee Hills: MrExplainer.com

Sally Miller: SallyAnnMiller.com

Karen Smith: FindingPurpose.com

Brian CdeBaca: techtalklearn.com

Ryan Grant: OnlineSellingExperiment.com

Ryan Maher: RyanMaher.net

Megan Finkelstein: HandmadeBrooklyn.com

David Neff: HealFissures.com

Paul Osborne: mealbyte.com

Nick Horowski: Evo-health.com

JJ Mayo: FuelforEndurance.com

Ian Gordon: StartupDaddy.com

Chris Conley: GravityTank.com

Connie Ragen Green: ConnieRagenGreen.com

Megan Harrison: MeganKHarrison.com

Tyler Power: StealthTrips.com

Jacob Yanez: VentureFeasibility.com/

Travis Wilkerson: TraderTravis.com

Shane Addinall: InkfishDigital.com

Travis Allison: gocamp.pro

Shoukri Kattan: dreamjobexec.com

Jeffery Wood: sweatyshop.com

John Biglin: InterphaseSystems.com

Meredith Eisenberg: timetradersclub.com

Jonathan Looi: TheTravelGearReviews.com

Julia Darcy: LearnDoLabs.com

Alton Skinner: AltonSkinner.com

Deborah Helen: DeborahHelen.com

Frank Jones: FrankCJones.com

Nathan Ballash: NathanBallash.com

Kurt Libby: theaxiom.org

Christopher Olaes: tshirtdesigncoach.com

Charlie Cichetti: gbes.com

Adam Wallschlaeger: UnsubscribefromtheCubicle.com

Haydee Montemayor: loveandtreasure.com

Rob Jordan: KnowHowtoProfit.com

Allura Slater: heartmindkids.com

Ryan OLoughlin: englishformydream.com

Samantha Hoppes: hellobellastudio.com

Joe Barnosky: TheWorshipAcoustifier.com

Joshua Seadia: FoundMyPassion.com

Danielle Spataro: dreamjourneysecrets.com

Trevor Larcheveque: TheAmateurMaker.com

Keith Champion: HowtoRentaRoom.com

Dave Mooring: supersimpl.com

Brandon Jubar: BrandonJubar.com

Jill Morenz: DesignForRealPeople.com

Samuel Augustin: necessaryfit.com

Matt Barfield: autismmissionary.com

Robert Farrington: thecollegeinvestor.com

Diana Lopez: disruptivefounder.com

Jonah Kelly: testingthemuse.com

Rob Peters: madjack3dprints.com

Erik Johnson: PodcastTalentCoach.com

Doug May: WSGear.com

Kinsey Roberts: vistaviewevents.com

Mikel Billstrom: fromthebottom.net

Nathan Shearer: rapidstartup.io

Lucinda Lions: lionwriting.com.au

Meredith Hurston: MeredithHurston.com

Sue Sundstrom: SueSundstrom.com

Christina Gmyr: fleetinglife.com

Michael O’Sullivan: KimberlyCarrHomeDesigns.com

Dave Tng: SmartPassiveCashFlow.com

Mihai Herman: MihaiHerman.com

Nils Smith: NilsSmithSolutions.com

Gisèle St. Hilaire: sunyatamovementstudio.com

Edward Prieto: eyefordesigns.com

Rob Orr: RobOrr.net

Vince Carter: bootstrappingit.com

Nick Weisenberger: coaster101.com

Courtney Slaziik: clickitupanotch.com

Brent Warner: edtech.tv

JP Camara: JPCamara.com

Sam Montoya: TheCuriousNovice.com

Michael Hall: financiallyalert.com

Roxanne Gilmore: RoxanneGilmore.com

Paul Fredette: MaryClaireAndPaul.com

Iris Gonzalez: evolutionari.com

Ron Kelleher: RonKelleher.com

Safiyah Satterwhite: fearlessandfree.tv

Robert Taylor: preachnet.com

Eddie Ferguson: FergusonFirearmsTraining.com

Benji Walklet: thecoffeeconcierge.net

Astrid von Weittenhiller: lifecatcher.de

Shannon Bradford: richcareernation.com

Mama Natural: MamaNatural.com

Seth Price: CraftofMarketing.com

Pete Nicolay: howtoanalyst.com

Jon Toy: Jon-Toy.com

Jason Linett: TransformationZone.com

Jason Heninger: guitartree.com

Christian Akesson: YourGuidetotheInternet.com

Jake Mensing: TheTurfSpot.com

Sarah Hammond: BestADHDLife.com

Gary Ware: breakthroughplay.com

Heidi Bender: tonsofthanks.com

David Hooper: redpodcast.com

Benny Hsu: getbusylivingblog.com

Jose Maldonado: DiabeticCaveman.com

Yasir Shah: basitsolutionsgroup.com

Scott Wasserman: VisionedMedia.com

Ronen Bekerman: RonenBekerman.com

Marietta Stalcup: ievolvellc.com

Paul Tinsley: containercraze.com

Albert Thomas: educopilot.com

Maria Murillo: CostaRica-Authentic.com

Karin Joan: KarinJoan.nl

Mike LaPierre: MikeLaPierre.com

Fernando Ramirez: PowerUpMM

Laura Mabille: LauraMabille.fr

Joona Tuunanen: iamjoona.com

Julie Santosuosso: millennialboss.com/

Lawrence Davis: dropthatgut.com

Martin Diaz: tuvistasana.com

Randy Braatz: flyboytoys.com

Lana Camiel: LanaCamiel.com

Jon Albano: LodgingMetrics.com

Matt Handal: HelpEverybodyEveryDay.com

Nikki Massie: bariatricfoodie.com

Victor Miller: VictorMiller.co

Carin Clark: carinkilbyclark.com

John Shirk: rehealthyourself.com

Lise Halskov: onlinehaj.dk

Yehudit Steinberg: thinkgrowlive.com

Amy Smith: SaratogaArms.com

Tommy Venuti: modernfitnessandfatloss.com

Wes Winsor: WesWinsorLaw.com

Walt Sparling: functionsense.com

Monica Metz: MonicaMetz.com

David Conklin: VirtueYou.com

Nicola Semple: howtobuildyourbusinessonline.com

Mark Schinnerer: patrioticexpressions.com

Michelle Stephens: ProWebCopy.com

Mike Bayer: VacationRentalFormula.com

Marc Johanssen: motoanswers.com

Katanna Castille: GetLifeCoached.com

Joseph Muench: PharmacyJoe.com

Tracie Kim: sixdegreesgirl.com

John Zenkert: reviewcraft.com

Kevin Tang: vyper.io

Angel Anderson: AngelAnderson.com

Randy Overly: uddermarketing.com

Gerard Gonzales: redbarn.toys

Skye Coleman: engineeredpath.com

Wayne Morgan: uselife.com

John Guidroz: SnapSoccer.com

Lain Ehmann: LainEhmann.com

Andrea Tabler: tablerpartyoftwo.com

Nayo Carter-Gray: 1stStepAccounting.com

Gilda Avila: GildaAvila.com

Peter Kang: groveave.co

Teresa Shindle: weelittlemebooks.com

Roger Graves: TheAutomationPro.com

Hank Osborne: homeschoolsupport.net

Peter Morrison: simple-nourished-living.com

Dina Virrueta: YourBrandtasticPodcast.com

Greg Harrington: actioneersmobile.com

Jens Hilgedieck: ParttimeEntrepreneur.de

Paul Potter: PaulPotterPT.com

Benjamin Arellano: benpreneur.com

Anthony Surrette: AnthonySurrette.com

Jennie Kesselman: happyhealthylady.com

Matt Lichtenwalner: dragonbones.net

Mitch Vogel: medicalbusinessacademy.com

Eva Rawposa: launchyourbliss.com

Josh Haroldson: OurFirstDrink.com

Owen Anderson: businessboostexperts.com

Jason Hobbs: learn.withbitsoflogic.com

Matt Lovell: MattLovell.net

Anthony Niebo: AnthonyNiebo.com

Rebecca Franklin: RebeccaFranklin.com

Nate Comerford: hackingyourbudget.com

Jeff Prewitt: JeffPrewitt.com

Susan Marett: canineconfidenceuniversity.com

Linda Curty: LindaCurty.com

Khaleef Crumbley: knsfinancial.com

Dan Horner: ProgrammingDecoded.com

Gary Foote: theunstucklife.com

Lauree Sayne: dancingdishanddecor.com/

Peter Lowles: thelandingpagecoach.com

Kenneth Titus: GovernmentJobHQ.com

Charlie Cichetti: sigearth.com

Kat Abianac: katabianac.com

Alessandra Colaci: influencebuzz.com

Wendy Kim: yourdreamrealized.com

LaTonya Walker: JustTonya.com

Barry Stott-Brookes: thearchitectsatelier.com

Lindsey Aleson: blogmelovely.com

David Parra: DavidParra.com

T Wong: exetermedicalacupuncture.co.uk

Cath Andrews: raising-happy-chickens.com

Jose Mario Hilario: virtualcareersbook.com

Keith Mc Manus: redesignmyexistence.com

Sebastian Czypionka: bonek.de

Jonathan Hall: awesome40s.com

Karo Paszkowska: TrustKoaching

Seph Fontane Pennock: positivepsychologyprogram.com

Ross Worden: conquestmaps.com

John Richmond: rich-productions.com

Hannah Rose: wholefoodiechallenge.com

Alessio Rozzi: SpringsteenBootlegCollection.com

Rich Sadler: profitfromparadise.com

George Laurentiu Saioc: beonweb.ro

Jamie Francis: francisbrothersfilms.com

Vandana Taxali: entcounsel.com

Allan Ngo: DigitalSolopreneur.com

Mayank Gupta: simplestartup.net

Jacquie Treagus: roamingcooking.com

Daniel Pallaras: ModernEducation.com.au

PreserveYourPlanet.com

Will It Fly Becomes a Bestseller! Shout Outs to All Who Helped

My new book, Will It Fly?, is now a bestseller!

It hit #1 in all business related categories on Amazon this week, including #1 in Entrepreneurship, #1 in Startups, and even #1 in Self-Help/Motivational. Furthermore, the paperback copy of the book got up to #80 Overall Best Seller (out of all books!), and the Kindle version climbed to Top #22 Overall Best Seller in the Kindle Store.

And at one point, both the Kindle and Paperback copy were both #1 and #2 in the Entrepreneurial category, which was super cool to see:

Screenshot 2016-02-03 15.01.31

It’s still pretty crazy to me to see it do so well in the rankings, surpassing several authors I admire and well-known books that have been around for ages. Of course, I’m coming off the excitement of the launch and the true test is how well will the book do over the long haul, but based on many of the comments from readers, it’s set up to be a big game-changer and one that should have some good legs to it.

Almost a dozen people have called it “the next 4-Hour Work Week,” which is an incredibly amazing comment to hear, especially because that book helped change my life. I’m hoping my book will do the same for others for a long time to come.

Thank —all of you—who have helped support the book in one way or another. Whether you purchased a copy, many copies, or simply shared it with others, I’m incredibly thankful for you and your support.

And if you have yet to pick up the book, click here to get it now!

Where Will It Fly? Was Featured

I wanted to take this opportunity to give a shout out to those who helped promote the book. Some of the links below are to interviews on podcasts and blogs that were planned months in advance, and others reviews and mentions were done without me even knowing it, which is awesome!

If you happen to write a review about Will It Fly? on your blog, or feature it in a podcast of your own, shoot me an email at [email protected], and I’ll include that link and highlight it here too.

Will It Fly Book: Business Validation Strategies from Pat Flynn [LNIM090] (Late Night Internet Marketing)

YOU150 – Conquering Self-Publishing & Asking Ourselves ‘Will It Fly?’, with Pat Flynn (YouPreneur with Chris Ducker)

MBA506 Guest Teacher: Pat Flynn – How to Define Your Ideal Customer (The $100 MBA)

Starve Wars – Will It Fly w/ @PatFlynn (Jared Easley on Starve the Doubts)

Test Your Business Idea Without Wasting Time & Money with Pat Flynn (Jaime Tardy and EventualMillionaire.com)

Freedom Hackers Q&A With Pat Flynn [Webinar] (Kimra Luna)

Will It Fly? An Interview with Pat Flynn (Hal Elrod)

How to Test Your Next Business Idea (Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield)

SFN140: Got a Business Idea? Make sure that it will work, with Pat Flynn (Start from Nothing with Andy Drish)

Will It Fly? with Pat Flynn (Build Your Tribe with Chalene Johnson)

Pat Flynn on How to Know If Your Business Idea Will Work (Ray Edwards)

#TLS #118: Proactively Parenting with an Entrepreneurial Mindset with Pat Flynn (The Lively Show with Jess Lively)

101: Will It Fly? How to Validate Your Business Before You Invest, With Pat Flynn (My Wife Quit Her Job with Steve Chou)

Building Business Ideas That Succeed: How to Preflight Your Ideas (The Social Media Examiner Show with Michael Stelzner)

434 – How Do You Know If Your Idea Will Succeed? An Interview with Pat Flynn (Podcast Answer Man with Cliff Ravenscraft)

Are you as good as you’re gonna get? (48 Days with Dan Miller)

SA 86: Pat Flynn Wants You to Fly (The Social Authority Podcast with Amy Schmittauer)

Pat Flynn | Will It Fly? [Episode 483] (The Art of Charm with Jordan Harbinger)

1198: Will It Fly? Pat Flynn Shares How to Test Your Next Business Idea So You Don’t Waste Your Time (Entrepreneur On Fire with John Lee Dumas)

Pat Flynn: How To (Profitably) Launch Anything (Freedom Fast Lane with Ryan Moran)

Pat Flynn Asks, “Will It Fly?” M&M Podcast 15 (Money & Media Podcast with Philip Taylor)

092: Pat Flynn: Validate Your Idea Before You Leap (The Portfolio Life with Jeff Goins)

Pat Flynn: Will It Fly? How to Validate or Find a Profitable Topic For Your Online Business (Entrepreneurs Journey with Yaro Starak)

How to Turn Your Product Daydreams Into Reality (Problogger Podcast with Darren Rowse)

312 | Will Your Business Idea Fly, An Interview with Pat Flynn (Internet Business Mastery)

377: Pat Flynn: Test Your Business Before You Invest (The Solopreneur Hour with Michael O’Neal)

How to Get Your Big Idea Off the Ground (Michael Hyatt Blog)

Change Maker: Pat Flynn of Smart Passive Income (Teachable Blog)

Will It Fly? Pat Flynn Knows the Answer (Write to Be Read with Ani Alexander)

GBL059: My Advice to Those Dreaming About Starting an Online Business (Get Busy Living Blog with Benny Hsu)

Pat Flynn’s New Book Soars (Dot Cannon from Two Maverix)

Will It Fly? Book Launch Team and Book Review (Testing the Muse)

Will It Fly (Make Money with Words with Karmen)

Will It Fly: Book Review (The Seasonal Diet with Sarah)

WNOP 070: Jak przetestowa? swój pomys? na biznes, aby nie zmarnowa? czasu i pieni?dzy – opowiada Pat Flynn (Michal Szafranski)

Will It Fly Book Review (Pat Flynn is So White) (Franki from FBK Write)

How to Test Your Idea Before Taking the Plunge (Sam from My College Life Coach)

How to Validate a Business Idea  (Will from Will You Laugh)

Testing Your Business Idea (Frank from Franc C Jones)

I’d Also Like to Thank…

The launch team, of course, who had an amazing impact on the success of this book. Plus, a whole lot of people who picked up pre-order copies of the book that I promised to say thanks to publicly here on the blog. This includes:

Adam Preiser: WPCrafter.com

Jason Logsdon: ModernistCookingMadeEasy.com

Shimeka Williams: EscapingcubicleCaptivity.com

Monica Louie: OurDebtFreeFamily.com

Walt Breuninger: CanIPlayThrough.com

Tyler Philbrook: IAmtheFutureMe.com

Sam Gavis-Hughson: byte-by-byte.com

Dave Koziel: DaveKoziel.com

Mark Mason: latenightim.com

Scott Maderer: ChristianStewardshipCoaching.com

Brandon Richardson: FBAroadmap.com

Darek Chojnacki: BusinessRunway.com

Susan Rampson: MidlifeFreedom.com

Chris Gilbert: tagrtime.com

Meggan Hill: CulinaryHill.com

Stephanie Dennis: FindingtheBestFit.com

Joe Baird: LearnitMakeit.com

Beth Anne Schwamberger: BrilliantBusinessMoms.com

Jason Resnick: rezzz.com

Vicki Mager: Eyedbands.com

Jeff Lord: WeReadEveryday.com

The 5DayDeal Team: 5daydeal.com

Jeff Agostinelli: JeffAgostinelli.com

LaTesha Burroughs: OptimizePlayer.com

John Meese: JohnMeese.me

Mitzi Eaker: MitziJaneMedia.com

Dylan Tanner: glaance.com

Karen B: FlexFitStudio.com

Ken Blevins: metrowestres.com

Christine Murphy: mythankyousite.com

Anil Agrawal: LeadershipFocusHQ.com

Robin “Kaley” Shorter: spacetosmile.com

Joseph Paun: wrestlingdad.com

Ryan Rhoten: RyanRhoten.com

Ree Klein: PrivateLabelPreneur.com

Grant Brott: HauntedHouseStartup.com

Tripp Fuller: HomebrewedChristianity.com

Sarah Heredia: Eventparty.supplies

Todd Faulk: PsoriasisNow.com

Rick Coplin: RickCoplin.com

Bill Gordon: wgordon3.com

Fumnanya Bernard: TheLimitBreaker.com

Bennett Coughlan: WeLearnWordpress.com

Bryan Kesler: ultimateCPAexamguide.com

Erik VanLandingham: DrivenKid.com

Matthew Smith: SqueakyCleanTeeth.com

Christian Karasiewicz: SocialChefs.com

Carlos Lall: assume-wisely.com

Matt D’Angelo: FlyingJourney.com

John Pullum: Pullum.com

Kenny Azama: BrandAmbassadorWorld.com

Evan Paquette: MagicEvan.com

Molly Mahoney: ThePreparedPerformer.com

Heather Green: lifeinthegreenroom.com

Tanya McGill Freeman: DigitalSophisticate.com

Layne Johnson: LayneJohnson.com

Ethan Robish: EthanRobish.com

Oxana Holtmann: OxanaHoltmann.com

Keith Shimon: body-activation.com

Lily Fouts: LilyAnnFouts.com

Jeremiah Candelaria: WeChooseWonder.com

Chris Goosman: BaselineAudio.com

Joella Castillo: JoellaCastillo.com

Shira Nelson: MomBeyondBaby.com

Jared Caya: OrthoticProstheticStudyGuide.com

Ben Shatto: ThePhysicalTherapyAdvisor.com

Teri Black: tbcrecruiting.com

Kathleen Thompson: KathleenAnnThompson.com

Heather Newton: get.ourstory.online

Dane Gilson: DaneGilson.com

Lee Hills: MrExplainer.com

Sally Miller: SallyAnnMiller.com

Karen Smith: FindingPurpose.com

Brian CdeBaca: techtalklearn.com

Ryan Grant: OnlineSellingExperiment.com

Ryan Maher: RyanMaher.net

Megan Finkelstein: HandmadeBrooklyn.com

David Neff: HealFissures.com

Paul Osborne: mealbyte.com

Nick Horowski: Evo-health.com

JJ Mayo: FuelforEndurance.com

Ian Gordon: StartupDaddy.com

Chris Conley: GravityTank.com

Connie Ragen Green: ConnieRagenGreen.com

Megan Harrison: MeganKHarrison.com

Tyler Power: StealthTrips.com

Jacob Yanez: VentureFeasibility.com/

Travis Wilkerson: TraderTravis.com

Shane Addinall: InkfishDigital.com

Travis Allison: gocamp.pro

Shoukri Kattan: dreamjobexec.com

Jeffery Wood: sweatyshop.com

John Biglin: InterphaseSystems.com

Meredith Eisenberg: timetradersclub.com

Jonathan Looi: TheTravelGearReviews.com

Julia Darcy: LearnDoLabs.com

Alton Skinner: AltonSkinner.com

Deborah Helen: DeborahHelen.com

Frank Jones: FrankCJones.com

Nathan Ballash: NathanBallash.com

Kurt Libby: theaxiom.org

Christopher Olaes: tshirtdesigncoach.com

Charlie Cichetti: gbes.com

Adam Wallschlaeger: UnsubscribefromtheCubicle.com

Haydee Montemayor: loveandtreasure.com

Rob Jordan: KnowHowtoProfit.com

Allura Slater: heartmindkids.com

Ryan OLoughlin: englishformydream.com

Samantha Hoppes: hellobellastudio.com

Joe Barnosky: TheWorshipAcoustifier.com

Joshua Seadia: FoundMyPassion.com

Danielle Spataro: dreamjourneysecrets.com

Trevor Larcheveque: TheAmateurMaker.com

Keith Champion: HowtoRentaRoom.com

Dave Mooring: supersimpl.com

Brandon Jubar: BrandonJubar.com

Jill Morenz: DesignForRealPeople.com

Samuel Augustin: necessaryfit.com

Matt Barfield: autismmissionary.com

Robert Farrington: thecollegeinvestor.com

Diana Lopez: disruptivefounder.com

Jonah Kelly: testingthemuse.com

Rob Peters: madjack3dprints.com

Erik Johnson: PodcastTalentCoach.com

Doug May: WSGear.com

Kinsey Roberts: vistaviewevents.com

Mikel Billstrom: fromthebottom.net

Nathan Shearer: rapidstartup.io

Lucinda Lions: lionwriting.com.au

Meredith Hurston: MeredithHurston.com

Sue Sundstrom: SueSundstrom.com

Christina Gmyr: fleetinglife.com

Michael O’Sullivan: KimberlyCarrHomeDesigns.com

Dave Tng: SmartPassiveCashFlow.com

Mihai Herman: MihaiHerman.com

Nils Smith: NilsSmithSolutions.com

Gisèle St. Hilaire: sunyatamovementstudio.com

Edward Prieto: eyefordesigns.com

Rob Orr: RobOrr.net

Vince Carter: bootstrappingit.com

Nick Weisenberger: coaster101.com

Courtney Slaziik: clickitupanotch.com

Brent Warner: edtech.tv

JP Camara: JPCamara.com

Sam Montoya: TheCuriousNovice.com

Michael Hall: financiallyalert.com

Roxanne Gilmore: RoxanneGilmore.com

Paul Fredette: MaryClaireAndPaul.com

Iris Gonzalez: evolutionari.com

Ron Kelleher: RonKelleher.com

Safiyah Satterwhite: fearlessandfree.tv

Robert Taylor: preachnet.com

Eddie Ferguson: FergusonFirearmsTraining.com

Benji Walklet: thecoffeeconcierge.net

Astrid von Weittenhiller: lifecatcher.de

Shannon Bradford: richcareernation.com

Mama Natural: MamaNatural.com

Seth Price: CraftofMarketing.com

Pete Nicolay: howtoanalyst.com

Jon Toy: Jon-Toy.com

Jason Linett: TransformationZone.com

Jason Heninger: guitartree.com

Christian Akesson: YourGuidetotheInternet.com

Jake Mensing: TheTurfSpot.com

Sarah Hammond: BestADHDLife.com

Gary Ware: breakthroughplay.com

Heidi Bender: tonsofthanks.com

David Hooper: redpodcast.com

Benny Hsu: getbusylivingblog.com

Jose Maldonado: DiabeticCaveman.com

Yasir Shah: basitsolutionsgroup.com

Scott Wasserman: VisionedMedia.com

Ronen Bekerman: RonenBekerman.com

Marietta Stalcup: ievolvellc.com

Paul Tinsley: containercraze.com

Albert Thomas: educopilot.com

Maria Murillo: CostaRica-Authentic.com

Karin Joan: KarinJoan.nl

Mike LaPierre: MikeLaPierre.com

Fernando Ramirez: PowerUpMM

Laura Mabille: LauraMabille.fr

Joona Tuunanen: iamjoona.com

Julie Santosuosso: millennialboss.com/

Lawrence Davis: dropthatgut.com

Martin Diaz: tuvistasana.com

Randy Braatz: flyboytoys.com

Lana Camiel: LanaCamiel.com

Jon Albano: LodgingMetrics.com

Matt Handal: HelpEverybodyEveryDay.com

Nikki Massie: bariatricfoodie.com

Victor Miller: VictorMiller.co

Carin Clark: carinkilbyclark.com

John Shirk: rehealthyourself.com

Lise Halskov: onlinehaj.dk

Yehudit Steinberg: thinkgrowlive.com

Amy Smith: SaratogaArms.com

Tommy Venuti: modernfitnessandfatloss.com

Wes Winsor: WesWinsorLaw.com

Walt Sparling: functionsense.com

Monica Metz: MonicaMetz.com

David Conklin: VirtueYou.com

Nicola Semple: howtobuildyourbusinessonline.com

Mark Schinnerer: patrioticexpressions.com

Michelle Stephens: ProWebCopy.com

Mike Bayer: VacationRentalFormula.com

Marc Johanssen: motoanswers.com

Katanna Castille: GetLifeCoached.com

Joseph Muench: PharmacyJoe.com

Tracie Kim: sixdegreesgirl.com

John Zenkert: reviewcraft.com

Kevin Tang: vyper.io

Angel Anderson: AngelAnderson.com

Randy Overly: uddermarketing.com

Gerard Gonzales: redbarn.toys

Skye Coleman: engineeredpath.com

Wayne Morgan: uselife.com

John Guidroz: SnapSoccer.com

Lain Ehmann: LainEhmann.com

Andrea Tabler: tablerpartyoftwo.com

Nayo Carter-Gray: 1stStepAccounting.com

Gilda Avila: GildaAvila.com

Peter Kang: groveave.co

Teresa Shindle: weelittlemebooks.com

Roger Graves: TheAutomationPro.com

Hank Osborne: homeschoolsupport.net

Peter Morrison: simple-nourished-living.com

Dina Virrueta: YourBrandtasticPodcast.com

Greg Harrington: actioneersmobile.com

Jens Hilgedieck: ParttimeEntrepreneur.de

Paul Potter: PaulPotterPT.com

Benjamin Arellano: benpreneur.com

Anthony Surrette: AnthonySurrette.com

Jennie Kesselman: happyhealthylady.com

Matt Lichtenwalner: dragonbones.net

Mitch Vogel: medicalbusinessacademy.com

Eva Rawposa: launchyourbliss.com

Josh Haroldson: OurFirstDrink.com

Owen Anderson: businessboostexperts.com

Jason Hobbs: learn.withbitsoflogic.com

Matt Lovell: MattLovell.net

Anthony Niebo: AnthonyNiebo.com

Rebecca Franklin: RebeccaFranklin.com

Nate Comerford: hackingyourbudget.com

Jeff Prewitt: JeffPrewitt.com

Susan Marett: canineconfidenceuniversity.com

Linda Curty: LindaCurty.com

Khaleef Crumbley: knsfinancial.com

Dan Horner: ProgrammingDecoded.com

Gary Foote: theunstucklife.com

Lauree Sayne: dancingdishanddecor.com/

Peter Lowles: thelandingpagecoach.com

Kenneth Titus: GovernmentJobHQ.com

Charlie Cichetti: sigearth.com

Kat Abianac: katabianac.com

Alessandra Colaci: influencebuzz.com

Wendy Kim: yourdreamrealized.com

LaTonya Walker: JustTonya.com

Barry Stott-Brookes: thearchitectsatelier.com

Lindsey Aleson: blogmelovely.com

David Parra: DavidParra.com

T Wong: exetermedicalacupuncture.co.uk

Cath Andrews: raising-happy-chickens.com

Jose Mario Hilario: virtualcareersbook.com

Keith Mc Manus: redesignmyexistence.com

Sebastian Czypionka: bonek.de

Jonathan Hall: awesome40s.com

Karo Paszkowska: TrustKoaching

Seph Fontane Pennock: positivepsychologyprogram.com

Ross Worden: conquestmaps.com

John Richmond: rich-productions.com

Hannah Rose: wholefoodiechallenge.com

Alessio Rozzi: SpringsteenBootlegCollection.com

Rich Sadler: profitfromparadise.com

George Laurentiu Saioc: beonweb.ro

Jamie Francis: francisbrothersfilms.com

Vandana Taxali: entcounsel.com

Allan Ngo: DigitalSolopreneur.com

Mayank Gupta: simplestartup.net

Jacquie Treagus: roamingcooking.com

Daniel Pallaras: ModernEducation.com.au

5 Things to Consider for Content Curation

Let’s be clear about the mission of content marketing: to use content to reach, engage, and build trust with your audience so that when they’re ready to buy, they’ll consider your company. But it’s not just about any content. Your prospects are overwhelmed by low quality information that neither enlightens nor delivers on its promise.
Today’s buyers are savvier and more demanding. They expect more. And, if you can’t provide content they can actually use, they will go elsewhere. The best marketers create great content on a consistent basis; however, they also complement their own original content with curated content. In fact, they use a mix of 65 percent created, 25 percent curated and 10 percent syndicated content.

Curating with a mission

As Ardath Albee, CEO and B2B marketing strategist recently observed: “If you share someone else’s ideas and expand upon them with your own, you gain credibility, share your knowledge, and make whatever you curated more valuable in the process.” This is content curation.

Content curation also enables you to fuel your content marketing engine on a reduced budget. You cannot possibly create all the information that your digitally charged yet attention-challenged customers and prospects need.

Yet you can guide, enlighten, and even delight them with perceptive insights, garnered from a range of sources through content curation. As a savvy content curator, you have a point of view. You also have an opportunity to mold the conversation.

5 factors for deciding what to curate

In today’s digital age, a content curator serves as the information gatekeeper. Much like publishers in previous eras, curators channel the inquiries and interests of a target audience by systematically deciding what to publish.

With this role as an information gatekeeper in mind, here are five basic criteria for determining when assets should be incorporated into a curated collection.

1. Relevant

Consider whether a particular asset is relevant to your target audience. This is obviously a judgment call on your part. Determine whether it offers any additional insights that they do not already know.

2. Credible

Determine whether the content you are considering is from a source you can trust. Verify the authority by checking sources and references. Remember, your own credibility is on the line. You are the one determining the quality.

3. Diverse

Not every asset in your collection needs to reflect your own perspective. In fact, make sure you are capturing a range of facts, opinions, and insights around a particular topic. Try to present a comprehensive collection that addresses the important aspects, organized in a way that makes sense to you. Consider your target audience and try to be as comprehensive as possible.

4. Validating

Step back and view the collection as a whole. Do the assets validate your current perspective? Does the ongoing stream offer additional insights? A curated collection can validate what you already know as well as lead to new learning about a particular topic.

5. Unique

Be sure to offer a unique perspective. Are you providing your audience with information and insights not found elsewhere? Do you have an engaging point of view? Can you present the assets and weave the assets into a compelling story? As the curator, this is your opportunity to highlight and contextualize the information, to reinforce the uniqueness of your contribution.

Curating a collection is an ongoing activity, not a one-time event. You are going to get better over time.

Curating for content marketing

Done right, curation is going to be an essential part of your content marketing program. As the demonstrated expert with insights and experience, you will build your audience of fans and followers, and along the way convert prospects into buyers.

To learn more about embedding content curation processes within a content marketing strategy, be sure to check out Curata’s eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Content Curation.

Use Hootsuite to curate content as part of your social media strategy. Sign up for free today!

Sign Up for Hootsuite

Bidding for top position on a SERP: what does it get you?

partner networks cpc

Automatic bidding algorithms have been a part of paid search tool sets for a long time and artificial intelligence is gaining more and more traction every day. 

While I think this is a tidal wave of information and computing power that’s coming towards every industry, I also think that there are very important strategic decisions that will always be in the hands of the search marketer.

One of those most often debated is the value of a top position. Many find themselves bidding to a top position simply because it feels like winning (which is a fantastic reason why removing human emotions in marketing decisions could be a great thing – score one for AI).

It is innately good to see your brand at the top of a search page, but I wanted to take a look at the difference between the top and side position. How does the rank of your ad impact its results? Does it differ on Google vs. their search partners? The findings were very interesting.

Top vs. Side

I started looking at data across the last 13 months across all verticals and terms. There is a point to be made about excluding branded terms, but for now I included them simply because they often will be displayed as a side ad even if they are the only ad in the auction.

This data can be pulled from Google using the Top vs. Other segment where you can pull this data for specific levels of your own accounts and brands.

The differences when combining all search traffic (Google + Partners) makes a very compelling case for top placements.

ads top vs side ctr

Not only does the user click-through on top ads at 10% (compared to 0.5% for the side), but the conversion rate is almost twice as high and the cost-per-click is significantly less. What could be better than that?

Another way to look at it is for every 100,000 impressions, the top ad position would net 3,349% more sales at a 63% lower cost per acquisition.

Again, I think branded terms have some level of impact to this analysis, but I think the idea that consumers have a better branded association with top ranked ads on the search results page is true.

Google vs. Partners

The difference for the partner network also tells a pretty interesting story.

The mothership outperforms the partner network in click through rate and conversion rate. This does however come at a premium. The CPCs are slightly higher.

partner networks cpc

Overall the Google domain yields a better CPA by 7% for side ads and 40% for the top ads more than offsetting the increase in cost per click.

According to the most recent earnings report, Google saw a 2% growth in partner traffic vs. a 40% growth in their own traffic. I’m sure that some of the shifts in their partner network have a lot to do with this, but maybe advertisers are getting savvier with their data and opting out of the partner network for these very reasons.

What should you do with this info?

  1. Dig into your own metrics. Measuring top position is almost never the right metric to judge success, however understanding the building blocks that make up your success is important.
  2. Consider if the search network is right for you. If you have a constrained budget it probably doesn’t make sense to extend your full keyword list to the partner network. This doesn’t have to be and shouldn’t be an all or nothing proposition. Determine the right keyword set or campaigns that perform best for you across the networks. The same can be said for extending your campaigns to Yahoo! and Bing.

Data is the best part of being a search marketer. I’ve said it a million times before, data is what separates success from failure in this business and it’s simple data like this that can help uncover some great opportunities for your business.

How to Add Multiple Accounts on Instagram

Instagram has finally brought one of the most-requested features ever to life: support for multiple accounts.

Let that sink in for a minute. Yes, it means what you think it means.

Some lucky Instagram users (this feature does not appear to be available to all of us as of yet), are now able to add multiple accounts to Instagram and easily switch between them.

Social media managers rejoice!

The feature was first reported in November 2015 by members of Instagram’s official beta testing group for Android. On February 3, 2016, some iOS users gained access.

How to add multiple accounts to Instagram

Select iOS users now have access to this feature. Find out if you’re one of them.

1. Visit your profile and go to “Settings” (the gear symbol in the upper right-hand corner). Then scroll to the bottom of the settings options and select the “Add Account” button. It should appear between “Clear Search History” and “Log Out” (if you don’t see it here, then you do not yet have access to the feature—hopefully we all will soon).

insta-multi-arrows01

2. Enter the info for the account you’d like to add and voila! You’re ready to manage multiple Instagram accounts.

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3. Once you’ve added a second (or third or fourth) account on Instagram, the profile icon in the bottom navigation bar (next to “Activity”) will change from the silhouette of a person into your profile picture. To switch between your different accounts, simply long-press your profile image in the nav bar until a pop up list of accounts appears. Then select your desired account and snap away!

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Now that it’s so easy to switch between multiple accounts, be sure you’re logged into the right account before you share an Instagram post using Hootsuite.

With this change , it’s now even easier for social media managers who handle multiple accounts to schedule an Instagram post via Hootsuite. Sign up for Hootsuite and try it today!

Sign Up for Hootsuite

WordStream’s Larry Kim on how paid social ads can become your ‘unicorns’

Reporting live from Connect, our two-day search event in Miami, here’s the second in a series of posts summarising a few of our sessions, covering either organic engagement or paid search innovation.

Yesterday, we heard from the awesome Larry Kim from WordStream, the most influential PPC expert for three years in a row and a man who can rattle through 156 fascinating and incredibly helpful slides without taking a breath.

What’s the current landscape of PPC?

Well, it doesn’t look great. As Larry says, “We’ve had a good run. It’s been 15 years, but there are headwinds on the horizon.”

And those ‘headwinds’ are…

  1. Paid search CPCs are at an all time high, across Google and Bing.
  2. Certain verticals are insanely expensive.
  3. Mobile is responsible for 50%+ of all Google searches.
  4. There are fewer ad spots on mobile.
  5. Apps are stealing from desktop searches, people are just opening a Yelp-type app and searching within there.
  6. 95% of time online is spent consuming content, but only 5% are actually searching for it.

But there is a new power rising in PPC: social media ads.

Social media ads

PPC marketers should pay more attention to social ads. Don’t be sceptical about this, because we can move far beyond the ‘like campaigns’ from a few short years ago.

The key to future social ads success is to focus on ‘assisted conversion’; using paid social ads to indirectly assist organic posts.

Social ads do fantastically well. They allow you to build up and amplify your brand, and create demand for your products or services.

Here you need to create content and “amplify the crap out of this stuff” in a very cheap manner and target the right people who will consume it.

The other thing that social ads do fantastically well is they can convert visitors into customers really easily, because you can filter users into very accurate demographics and remarket to a very narrow segment of those people.

As Larry says, “when you get this working, it’s like printing money.” And here’s the major reason why you should be doing social media ads…

Big ad budgets are not required. You can do extremely well with paid social ads for $50 or less.

Social media ad tips

Be aware of Facebook’s relevancy score. The higher the post engagement of the thing you want to promote (minus negative engagement – hiding it, reporting it as spam), the higher your relevancy score, and the more often your post will show.

Incidentally, Twitter copied the above exact process with its ad campaigns, they just called it a ‘quality adjusted bid’. Of course both of these have ripped off Google’s ‘quality score’ anyway, so fair enough.

The key to you ads appearing often on social is getting high engagement and increasing your quality score.

In order to achieve this, you must only promote your best stuff. The top 1% – 2% of your content, as Larry describes it, “Your unicorns.”

unicorn gif

Because they’re so rare and wonderful.

One example from Larry is a tweet of his, sharing a blog post he wrote about Alphabet (the new parent company for Google). Although this initially got a low 2-3% engagement rate, Larry then promoted it to influencers who had used the #alphabet hashtag in the previous seven days.

The tweet then increased to a 27% engagement rate, generated 2,100 visits, 348 retweets. All of this using just $49.

The worst thing you can do is divide your social ads budget equally between every post and promote them all equally. Again, pick your unicorns. Also don’t try promoting something this month that didn’t work last month, it won’t work this time either.

How do you find your unicorns? Larry uses the following ‘pyramid’…

“This pyramid scheme won’t land you in prison.” In fact it will help you see which posts have worked organically, and it’s these ‘winners’ that you’ll promote on social channels. Like you’re ‘auditioning them’.

It’s easy to find which social posts are the best because Facebook and Twitter lets you see how well they’ve performed in their own respective analytics tools, easily accessible from your page’s menu.

Larry goes on to say that the biggest difference between using paid social and organic social is your own ‘pickiness’. Organic posts are you casting a wide net, whereas paid is you casting a narrow net, but hopefully vastly increasing your engagement.